L’Epée 1839 is the only Swiss Manufacture specializing in the design and production of high-end mechanical clocks – an art it has been perpetuating for over 175 years. Today, the Manufacture is situated in Delémont in the Swiss Jura, where several skills essential to the production of luxury mechanical clocks are now united under one roof.

Specializing in horological complications for many years, L’Epée has built up an excellent reputation around the world. From computer-assisted design to the final technical checks and adjustments, all employees enthusiastically contribute to the creation of L’Epée timepieces distributed by Rick De La Croix. Their mastery of various tools and working methods has enabled the brand to adapt its complications in surprising ways: the transformation of the double retrograde seconds into a “laser cannon” on its Starfleet Machine is a prime example.

All L’Epée products bear the highly coveted “Swiss Made” label and, for the most part, conform to all the new regulations associated with this label. They strive to maintain a continuously high level of excellence in order to meet the quality standards exacted by the brand’s clientele of collectors and enthusiasts.

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Time Takes Flight: The First Suspended Clock

Immediate boarding on the Hot Balloon, the mechanical clock in the form of a hot air balloon created by L’Épée 1839. This suspended clock follows the brand’s other co-creations – the Vanitas and Arachnophobia wall clocks. Placed simply on a table or suspended from the ceiling as if flying through the air, this kinetic sculpture symbolizes adventure and whimsy while remaining an exceptional mechanical timepiece.

Inspired by the hot air balloon and all that it represents – adventure, imagination, discovery, ambition, freedom – Margo and L’Épée 1839 unveil a mechanical clock with impressive, sometimes floating presence which displays the hours and minutes for eight days.

 

An authentic piece of watchmaking art, Hot Balloon can also be admired from below, just as one might view a hot air balloon overhead, as is the very first mechanical clock that can be hung from the ceiling.